Wind & Hail Insurance


The Basics of Wind & Hail Insurance

If you’ve ever been concerned about what would happen if your home, car, or business property was damaged by wind or hail, you’re not alone. Wind and hail damage is the most common source of insurance claims in the United States, and millions of properties are insured for these perils. But what is wind and hail insurance and how does it work?

Unlike hurricane insurance, which covers losses pertaining only to damages resulting from hurricanes, wind and hail insurance protects against – you guessed it – wind and hail. This means that whether a tornado tears down your entire Victorian-era house or marble-sized hail damages the 20-year-old asphalt shingles on your 600 square foot lake cabin, your insurance company may cover the damages. If your property is damaged due to fire, however, this will likely not be covered if wind and hail are the only perils listed under your policy as being covered. Some policies are open-peril, which means that all losses may be covered, including wind and hail.

Who is wind and hail insurance for? Simply put, it is for anyone who has an insurable interest in a property, whether it be a car or building. Some properties, such as houses with a mortgage, are required to have coverage for wind, hail, and other perils, such as fire and theft.

So how does it work? Generally, if your property is damaged by wind or hail and you file a claim with your insurance company, an adjuster will come out to survey the damage and write an estimate for repairs. After the estimate is submitted to the insurance company, a check will be issued if the loss is covered and it is over the deductible.

Differences in coverage usually depend on the deductible amount, whether or not there is coverage for “other structures” and “contents”, and whether the policy provides a settlement amount for actual cash value or replacement cost value. The major benefit of having an insurance policy is being able to file a claim and have your property brought back to the way it was before the damage, if not better. This can save policyholders a substantial amount of stress and money.